Athletic Update December 2013

The Winter Season for the Eagles is off to great start!

In Boys Basketball, Milford’s early 2-1 record leads the ECC. The Eagles are 4-1 overall and picked up a key win over Loveland on Tuesday.  They take on Kings this Friday at home at 7:30 pm.

The Girls Basketball team is currently ranked 2nd in the ECC with a 3-1 record.  They travel to Hughes HS this Saturday.

Wrestling garnered two recent ECC wins over Kings and Anderson in a home tri-match.  The Eagles travel to Harrison this weekend for the Coaches Classic.

Swimming traveled to Anderson last night but fell to the Redskins in only the first loss of season for the boys’ side.  The Dive team got their highest scores of the year so far against Anderson last night.

The Boys Bowling team (2-3 ECC, 5-5 overall) took on Anderson today at 3:30 at Eastgate Lanes.  The Lady Eagles Bowling team (4-1 ECC, 7-3 overall) also battled Anderson today to maintain their ECC position, trailing only to Glen Este.

Academic Quiz team started the season off strong defeating Winton Woods, but they were unable to get past Walnut Hills.  They’ll continue to prepare as they head into the New Year taking on Kings after the break.

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9 thoughts on “Athletic Update December 2013

  1. Pingback: Highlights from 12/19/13 school board meeting | Andrea Brady's Blog

  2. Third time I have asked. STILL NO ANWER. Why would 13-14 year old play football?
    I lettered at middle guard. Two varsity and a reserve letter.

    • I asked the question to raise the difficulty of motivation. My football playing friends and I all think the same. We loved, glad we did it, probably do it again, but don’t want our kids to do it. Therein lies the unsolvable paradox.

      Iraised the question because you discussed all of the projects done for the program and ….

      Number listed in phone book, feel free to call.

    • At my office with DragonDictate at hand.

      Your inability to answer my question only illustrates the problem I wish to raise. Remember I played three years of football for Milford. I now live in Cheviot, my daughters graduated from Mother of Mercy and NKU. I started law school in 1978, and from that time to today, I have had little contact with Milford. However, I possess 23 years from 1955 to 78 of contact with Milford.

      Milford always struggled to field a football team, much less a good football team. In the sixth grade at St. Andrews I participated in a fundraiser for the football team. When I started for the football team. I possessed the self-awareness to know that better talent existed in the high school than me. I went out for the team and played. The talent lacked the motivation to play. I put myself through college officiating grade school and high school football. For almost 50 years. I have chewn on the question of motivating Milford’s 13 to 14-year-old males to play football.

      For reasons that baffle me, most of the grade school talent in Milford attends St. Andrews, my alma mater. In my memory, only two of these athletes went to Milford the two Meibers boys. No demographic analysis explains this unequal athletic talent to me. In my day. Steve Bates made one of my most treasured remarks to me when he said,”Greg, thoseMoeller players hit hard. Maybe we should all eat fish on Friday.” The Moeller reserve team defeated us 14 to 12. Our coach Tom Schraffenberger, and in retrospect I agree with him, told us that no Milford team that year, played harder than we did. (This occurred during the time John Boehner played for Moeller.) The Milford reserve team could compete against a GCL team. The varsity could not compete against an EHL team.

      I know what drove me to play high school football, even after I ruptured my left elbow bursa. I lack any knowledge of what drove my teammates to play. Without any responsibility for the team’s success, I suggest two answers to motivation. One, lack of community and institutional support of the program. Two, the actual disincentives that exist to play football. These same disincentives existed in my day. The players family must financially support them. One cannot play football and have the money and car. The college prep students will face enormous difficulty in playing and studying. The college prep students face the paradox that colleges and future employers award extra credit points for playing.

      Everyone on our team respected each other, whether we were each other’s friends or not. Only the football players, past and present, appreciate the difficulty of playing for a losing team. IT REQUIRES MORE COURAGE AND EFFORT TO MAKE A LOSER INTO A WINNER, than play for a winner. I have been there and I respect and applaud today’s players.

      Gregory A. Keer, Esq.
      MHS 67

      PS. To my teammates. I ran into Coach Sullivan at our class reunion. I will proudly repeat what he told me. “I never questioned how hard my players played for me.” In my officiating days many of my fellow officials told me the same thing. Coach Sullivan’s teams played harder than any other Milford football team they saw.
      At my office with DragonDictate at hand.

      Your inability to answer my question only illustrates the problem I wish to raise. Remember I played three years of football for Milford. I now live in Cheviot, my daughters graduated from Mother of Mercy and NKU. I started law school in 1978, and from that time to today, I have had little contact with Milford. However, I possess 23 years from 1955 to 78 of contact with Milford.

      Milford always struggled to field a football team, much less a good football team. In the sixth grade at St. Andrews I participated in a fundraiser for the football team. When I started for the football team. I possessed the self-awareness to know that better talent existed in the high school than me. I went out for the team and played. The talent lacked the motivation to play. I put myself through college officiating grade school and high school football. For almost 50 years. I have chewn on the question of motivating Milford’s 13 to 14-year-old males to play football.

      For reasons that baffle me, most of the grade school talent in Milford attends St. Andrews, my alma mater. In my memory, only two of these athletes went to Milford the two Meibers boys. No demographic analysis explains this unequal athletic talent to me. In my day. Steve Bates made one of my most treasured remarks to me when he said,”Greg, thoseMoeller players hit hard. Maybe we should all eat fish on Friday.” The Moeller reserve team defeated us 14 to 12. Our coach Tom Schraffenberger, and in retrospect I agree with him, told us that no Milford team that year, played harder than we did. (This occurred during the time John Boehner played for Moeller.) The Milford reserve team could compete against a GCL team. The varsity could not compete against an EHL team.

      I know what drove me to play high school football, even after I ruptured my left elbow bursa. I lack any knowledge of what drove my teammates to play. Without any responsibility for the team’s success, I suggest two answers to motivation. One, lack of community and institutional support of the program. Two, the actual disincentives that exist to play football. These same disincentives existed in my day. The players family must financially support them. One cannot play football and have the money and car. The college prep students will face enormous difficulty in playing and studying. The college prep students face the paradox that colleges and future employers award extra credit points for playing.

      Everyone on our team respected each other, whether we were each other’s friends or not. Only the football players, past and present, appreciate the difficulty of playing for a losing team. IT REQUIRES MORE COURAGE AND EFFORT TO MAKE A LOSER INTO A WINNER, than play for a winner. I have been there and I respect and applaud today’s players.

      Gregory A. Keer, Esq.
      MHS 67

      PS. To my teammates. I ran into Coach Sullivan at our class reunion. I will proudly repeat what he told me. “I never questioned how hard my players played for me.” In my officiating days many of my fellow officials told me the same thing. Coach Sullivan’s teams played harder than any other Milford football team they saw.

      At my office with DragonDictate at hand.

      Your inability to answer my question only illustrates the problem I wish to raise. Remember I played three years of football for Milford. I now live in Cheviot, my daughters graduated from Mother of Mercy and NKU. I started law school in 1978, and from that time to today, I have had little contact with Milford. However, I possess 23 years from 1955 to 78 of contact with Milford.

      Milford always struggled to field a football team, much less a good football team. In the sixth grade at St. Andrews I participated in a fundraiser for the football team. When I started for the football team. I possessed the self-awareness to know that better talent existed in the high school than me. I went out for the team and played. The talent lacked the motivation to play. I put myself through college officiating grade school and high school football. For almost 50 years. I have chewn on the question of motivating Milford’s 13 to 14-year-old males to play football.

      For reasons that baffle me, most of the grade school talent in Milford attends St. Andrews, my alma mater. In my memory, only two of these athletes went to Milford the two Meibers boys. No demographic analysis explains this unequal athletic talent to me. In my day. Steve Bates made one of my most treasured remarks to me when he said,”Greg, thoseMoeller players hit hard. Maybe we should all eat fish on Friday.” The Moeller reserve team defeated us 14 to 12. Our coach Tom Schraffenberger, and in retrospect I agree with him, told us that no Milford team that year, played harder than we did. (This occurred during the time John Boehner played for Moeller.) The Milford reserve team could compete against a GCL team. The varsity could not compete against an EHL team.

      I know what drove me to play high school football, even after I ruptured my left elbow bursa. I lack any knowledge of what drove my teammates to play. Without any responsibility for the team’s success, I suggest two answers to motivation. One, lack of community and institutional support of the program. Two, the actual disincentives that exist to play football. These same disincentives existed in my day. The players family must financially support them. One cannot play football and have the money and car. The college prep students will face enormous difficulty in playing and studying. The college prep students face the paradox that colleges and future employers award extra credit points for playing.

      Everyone on our team respected each other, whether we were each other’s friends or not. Only the football players, past and present, appreciate the difficulty of playing for a losing team. IT REQUIRES MORE COURAGE AND EFFORT TO MAKE A LOSER INTO A WINNER, than play for a winner. I have been there and I respect and applaud today’s players.

      Gregory A. Keer, Esq.
      MHS 67

      PS. To my teammates. I ran into Coach Sullivan at our class reunion. I will proudly repeat what he told me. “I never questioned how hard my players played for me.” In my officiating days many of my fellow officials told me the same thing. Coach Sullivan’s teams played harder than any other Milford football team they saw.

      At my office with DragonDictate at hand.

      Your inability to answer my question only illustrates the problem I wish to raise. Remember I played three years of football for Milford. I now live in Cheviot, my daughters graduated from Mother of Mercy and NKU. I started law school in 1978, and from that time to today, I have had little contact with Milford. However, I possess 23 years from 1955 to 78 of contact with Milford.

      Milford always struggled to field a football team, much less a good football team. In the sixth grade at St. Andrews I participated in a fundraiser for the football team. When I started for the football team. I possessed the self-awareness to know that better talent existed in the high school than me. I went out for the team and played. The talent lacked the motivation to play. I put myself through college officiating grade school and high school football. For almost 50 years. I have chewn on the question of motivating Milford’s 13 to 14-year-old males to play football.

      For reasons that baffle me, most of the grade school talent in Milford attends St. Andrews, my alma mater. In my memory, only two of these athletes went to Milford the two Meibers boys. No demographic analysis explains this unequal athletic talent to me. In my day. Steve Bates made one of my most treasured remarks to me when he said,”Greg, thoseMoeller players hit hard. Maybe we should all eat fish on Friday.” The Moeller reserve team defeated us 14 to 12. Our coach Tom Schraffenberger, and in retrospect I agree with him, told us that no Milford team that year, played harder than we did. (This occurred during the time John Boehner played for Moeller.) The Milford reserve team could compete against a GCL team. The varsity could not compete against an EHL team.

      I know what drove me to play high school football, even after I ruptured my left elbow bursa. I lack any knowledge of what drove my teammates to play. Without any responsibility for the team’s success, I suggest two answers to motivation. One, lack of community and institutional support of the program. Two, the actual disincentives that exist to play football. These same disincentives existed in my day. The players family must financially support them. One cannot play football and have the money and car. The college prep students will face enormous difficulty in playing and studying. The college prep students face the paradox that colleges and future employers award extra credit points for playing.

      Everyone on our team respected each other, whether we were each other’s friends or not. Only the football players, past and present, appreciate the difficulty of playing for a losing team. IT REQUIRES MORE COURAGE AND EFFORT TO MAKE A LOSER INTO A WINNER, than play for a winner. I have been there and I respect and applaud today’s players.

      Gregory A. Keer, Esq.
      MHS 67

      PS. To my teammates. I ran into Coach Sullivan at our class reunion. I will proudly repeat what he told me. “I never questioned how hard my players played for me.” In my officiating days many of my fellow officials told me the same thing. Coach Sullivan’s teams played harder than any other Milford football team they saw.

      At my office with DragonDictate at hand.

      Your inability to answer my question only illustrates the problem I wish to raise. Remember I played three years of football for Milford. I now live in Cheviot, my daughters graduated from Mother of Mercy and NKU. I started law school in 1978, and from that time to today, I have had little contact with Milford. However, I possess 23 years from 1955 to 78 of contact with Milford.

      Milford always struggled to field a football team, much less a good football team. In the sixth grade at St. Andrews I participated in a fundraiser for the football team. When I started for the football team. I possessed the self-awareness to know that better talent existed in the high school than me. I went out for the team and played. The talent lacked the motivation to play. I put myself through college officiating grade school and high school football. For almost 50 years. I have chewn on the question of motivating Milford’s 13 to 14-year-old males to play football.

      For reasons that baffle me, most of the grade school talent in Milford attends St. Andrews, my alma mater. In my memory, only two of these athletes went to Milford the two Meibers boys. No demographic analysis explains this unequal athletic talent to me. In my day. Steve Bates made one of my most treasured remarks to me when he said,”Greg, thoseMoeller players hit hard. Maybe we should all eat fish on Friday.” The Moeller reserve team defeated us 14 to 12. Our coach Tom Schraffenberger, and in retrospect I agree with him, told us that no Milford team that year, played harder than we did. (This occurred during the time John Boehner played for Moeller.) The Milford reserve team could compete against a GCL team. The varsity could not compete against an EHL team.

      I know what drove me to play high school football, even after I ruptured my left elbow bursa. I lack any knowledge of what drove my teammates to play. Without any responsibility for the team’s success, I suggest two answers to motivation. One, lack of community and institutional support of the program. Two, the actual disincentives that exist to play football. These same disincentives existed in my day. The players family must financially support them. One cannot play football and have the money and car. The college prep students will face enormous difficulty in playing and studying. The college prep students face the paradox that colleges and future employers award extra credit points for playing.

      Everyone on our team respected each other, whether we were each other’s friends or not. Only the football players, past and present, appreciate the difficulty of playing for a losing team. IT REQUIRES MORE COURAGE AND EFFORT TO MAKE A LOSER INTO A WINNER, than play for a winner. I have been there and I respect and applaud today’s players.

      Gregory A. Keer, Esq.
      MHS 67

      PS. To my teammates. I ran into Coach Sullivan at our class reunion. I will proudly repeat what he told me. “I never questioned how hard my players played for me.” In my officiating days many of my fellow officials told me the same thing. Coach Sullivan’s teams played harder than any other Milford football team they saw.

      Unhappily, I have had to post a more extended discussion on mainly Milford. I cannot copy word perfect or Adobe to your blog.

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